Dance-Specific PT

Taylor Darwin, DPT

June 7, 2020


Our talented PT Taylor Darwin created an excellent breakdown of some dance-specific exercises. Having a history of being a competitive dancer, Taylor is your go-to PT for any dance-related injuries or questions!


For dancers, there are specific muscle groups that need to be strong in order to achieve specific goals. There are also muscles that require a certain amount of flexibility. These few exercises target muscles that contribute to adequate turnout, hip flexor, quadriceps, and calf strength along with posterior chain flexibility. Turnout is very important with this population and learning to work through what they have naturally along with strengthening the muscles that control it can prevent further injury.


1. Quadruped Tendu Extension: With leg at 45 degree angle, adduct and externally rotate while lifting your leg towards the ceiling while maintaining pelvic control. This exercise is great for improving turnout and glute strength!


 


2. Inchworms: Start by standing and walk hands down into a plank position. Hold the plank, and then walk both legs towards hands, doing your best to maintain knee extension. This exercise is great for hamstring flexibility and core strength!


 


3. Second Plié Squat: While standing in second position and maintaining hip external rotation, alternate between a deep squat and high relevé with an added hold for balance. This exercise is great for improving turnout and quad/calf strength.


 


4. Standing Marches: Add a band underneath feet for increased tension, and perform standing marches. This exercise is perfect for improving hip flexor strength and control!


 


5. Side-lying Passé: While side-lying, externally rotate your bottom leg while keeping the other leg behind. You foot should be flat on the mat and your knee bent in a passé position. With a band around your knees and maintaining pelvic control, slowly externally rotate the leg that is in passé.


 

Crossfit Open Prep

Jan 31, 2019

<div class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style="">The 2019 Crossfit Open is less than a month away and with five weeks worth of grueling workouts ahead, there is no time for aches and pains to be limiting your performance or keeping you off the leaderboard. A great way to prepare is to make sure you are moving well and have the requisite mobility requirements to execute major lifts. </font></div><div class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style=""><br></font></div><div class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style="">We will tackle the highest and lowest joints in the chain: shoulders and ankles. If you lack mobility in either of these joints, it is likely that you will have to compensate somewhere to get the most out of your pull, get under the bar or deep into your squat. We have provided a few self-assessment tests and options for movement prep if you are limited.</font></div><div class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style=""><br></font></div><div class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style=""><b>Overhead Shoulder Mobility:</b> Important for the OH squat, jerks/snatch, handstand PU, etc. </font></div><div class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style=""><br></font></div><div class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style="">Test – Seated Overhead Reach</font></div><div class="plain"><ul><li class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style="">Arm should pass ears </font></li><li class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style="">No space between lower back and wall</font></li><li class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style="">Can vary arm/leg position</font></li></ul><br></div><div class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style=""><iframe allow="accelerometer; autoplay; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture" allowfullscreen frameborder="0" height="171" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/4rKtHtCPmWo?wmode=transparent" width="300"></iframe><br></font></div><div class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style=""><br></font></div><div class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style="">Movement Prep (if limited with testing)</font></div><div class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style=""><br></font></div><div class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style="">1. Tall Kneeling Lat Stretch </font></div><div class="plain"><ul><li class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style="">Stretch felt under arm and mid-back area</font></li><li class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style="">Do not lose hand contact and let hands cave in</font></li></ul><font class="plainsmall" style=""><br></font></div><div class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style=""><iframe allow="accelerometer; autoplay; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture" allowfullscreen frameborder="0" height="171" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/DmYRVV_DpJA?wmode=transparent" width="300"></iframe><br></font></div><div class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style=""><br></font></div><div class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style="">2. Yoga Push-up</font></div><div class="plain"><ul><li class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style="">Push through the floor and away</font></li><li class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style="">Keep knees soft to avoid excessive hamstring tension or low back pain</font></li></ul><br></div><div class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style=""><iframe allow="accelerometer; autoplay; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture" allowfullscreen frameborder="0" height="171" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/Z8DXwkLig4A?wmode=transparent" width="300"></iframe><br></font></div><div class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style=""><br></font></div><div class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style="">3. Hollow Body Hang/Eccentric pull-up</font></div><div class="plain"><ul><li class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style="">Avoid excessive arching of low back</font></li><li class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style="">Keep abdominals contracted base of ribcage pulled down</font></li></ul><br></div><div class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style=""><iframe allow="accelerometer; autoplay; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture" allowfullscreen frameborder="0" height="171" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/s2-bSU1eUB0?wmode=transparent" width="300"></iframe><br></font></div><div class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style=""><b><br></b></font></div><div class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style=""><b>Shoulder Internal Rotation:</b> Important for any pull from the floor to a front rack or overhead position (clean, clean and jerk, snatch), muscle ups</font></div><div class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style=""><br></font></div><div class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style="">Test – Shoulder IR stabilized on wall</font></div><div class="plain"><ul><li class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style="">Range should be comparable to reps 1-2 the video or close to being in line with belly to keep the bar close to your body during a pull</font></li><li class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style="">Pain-free</font></li><li class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style="">No compensatory shoulder ROM (coming off wall or popping forward) as demonstrated after reps 1-2 </font></li></ul><br></div><div class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style=""><iframe allow="accelerometer; autoplay; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture" allowfullscreen frameborder="0" height="171" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/AB-iogzeL5M?wmode=transparent" width="300"></iframe><br></font></div><div class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style=""><br></font></div><div class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style="">1. Cross body IR (two options)</font></div><div class="plain"><ul><li class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style="">Stretch is felt in the back of the shoulder and upper arm</font></li><li class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style="">Side lying - Elbow pushes down into table with shoulder tucked back as you reach across body</font></li></ul><br><iframe allow="accelerometer; autoplay; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture" allowfullscreen frameborder="0" height="171" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/384Q9o0Xx_s?wmode=transparent" width="300"></iframe><br><br><ul><li class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style="">Doorframe - Stabilize side of shoulder blade on the doorframe so that it does not move as you pull arm across body</font></li></ul><br></div><div class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style=""><iframe allow="accelerometer; autoplay; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture" allowfullscreen frameborder="0" height="171" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/YHmA9VBqkQ0?wmode=transparent" width="300"></iframe><br></font></div><div class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style=""><br></font></div><div class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style="">2. Thoracic whips </font></div><div class="plain"><ul><li class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style="">Fast, repetitive movement to the side of the limited shoulder can rapidly “unlock” range of motion</font></li></ul></div><div class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style=""><br></font></div><div class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style=""><iframe allow="accelerometer; autoplay; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture" allowfullscreen frameborder="0" height="171" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/gM-72mahtps?wmode=transparent" width="300"></iframe><br></font></div><div class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style=""><br></font></div><div class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style=""><b>Ankle Dorsiflexion Mobility:</b>&nbsp; Important for any lift where your feet are in contact with the floor, running, etc. to decrease anterior knee stress during front loaded exercises, maximize squat depth, improve bar path</font></div><div class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style=""><br></font></div><div class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style="">Test – Half Kneeling Ankle Rock</font></div><div class="plain"><ul><li class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style="">Should reach knee to wall with foot at distance of YOUR fist width away</font></li><li class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style="">Knee should track towards middle to baby toe</font></li><li class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style="">Compensation with knee twisting inwards shown in video</font></li></ul><br></div><div class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style=""><iframe allow="accelerometer; autoplay; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture" allowfullscreen frameborder="0" height="171" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/4Ji07sR-mI8?wmode=transparent" width="300"></iframe><br></font></div><div class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style=""><br></font></div><div class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style="">1. Half Kneeling Ankle Rocks</font></div><div class="plain"><ul><li class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style="">Utilize half kneeling position or foot elevated on a bench to rock weight into front of ankle</font></li><li class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style="">Knee should track forward and out</font></li></ul><br></div><div class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style=""><iframe allow="accelerometer; autoplay; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture" allowfullscreen frameborder="0" height="171" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/6Qrhx0SSTFI?wmode=transparent" width="300"></iframe><br></font></div><div class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style=""><br></font></div><div class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style="">2. Lateral Ankle Rocks</font></div><div class="plain"><ul><li class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style="">Stabilize inside of foot as you stretch knee outwards</font></li><li class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style="">May improve ability to rock weight into front of ankle without knee caving in</font></li></ul><br></div><div class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style=""><iframe allow="accelerometer; autoplay; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture" allowfullscreen frameborder="0" height="171" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/Jt2Y5SsJA_Q?wmode=transparent" width="300"></iframe><br></font></div><div class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style=""><br></font></div><div class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style="">Jenna Mattera DPT, CSCS, &nbsp;<a class="plainsmall" href="mailto:jenna@soulpt.com" link="" rel="" target="_blank">jenna@soulpt.com</a></font></div><div class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style=""><br></font></div><div class="plain"><p class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style="">Soul Physical Therapy is a patient centered outpatient orthopedic physical therapy practice located in Beverly, MA. Our evidence-informed philosophy drives our physical therapists to improve the lives of patients through education, manual therapy and exercise.</font></p><p class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style=""><br></font></p><p class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style="">Soul Physical Therapy was the #1 Choice for Physical Therapy in the 2018 Wicked Local Readers Choice Awards for Beverly and was named the 2018 Small Business of the Year by the Greater Beverly Chamber of Commerce. To set up a complimentary screening email <a class="plainsmall" href="mailto:getwell@soulpt.com" link="" target="_blank">getwell@soulpt.com</a>&nbsp;or call (978) 524-0333.</font></p></div><div class="plain"><br></div>

Back to Basics: Assessing Common Upper Extremity Lifting Mistakes

Jan 30, 2019

<div class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style="">In a previous blog post, we discussed the potential problems that can be created from overarching in our low back during resting postures if and how to achieve a “neutral spine” or flat back through activation of our core.</font></div><div class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style=""><br></font></div><div class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style="">As human beings, we are not constantly sitting in one position (even if sometimes we would like to be). We are constantly walking, lifting, turning, and twisting, which all create new challenges to keeping our backs safe. A place we often see poor movement mechanics is in the gym and this is when it is most crucial to perform exercises with proper form as you are adding extra loads to your spine through weights and resistance.</font></div><div class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style=""><br></font></div><div class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style="">While it is great to push yourself to improve in the gym, it is crucial to make sure that it is being done safely. We want to train hard but smart and inside our capacity. In this post, we are going to look at some common gym exercises can cause you to arch your low back through compensation or improper form/core activation.</font></div><div class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style=""><br></font></div><div class="plain"><iframe allow="accelerometer; autoplay; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture" allowfullscreen frameborder="0" height="171" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/oXw8R6mwEYY?wmode=transparent" width="300"></iframe><br></div><div class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style=""><br></font></div><div class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style="">Push Up:&nbsp; We can see the patient arch his low back due to poor core activation with each rep. You should feel that your core was worked after a set of push-ups, as a push up is essentially a plank with motion.</font></div><div class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style=""><br></font></div><div class="plain"><iframe allow="accelerometer; autoplay; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture" allowfullscreen frameborder="0" height="171" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/xBK0G2YSi94?wmode=transparent" width="300"></iframe><br></div><div class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style=""><br></font></div><div class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style="">In the second video, we see the patient actively brace his core with each push-up, ensuring that he is keeping a neutral spine throughout the exercise.</font></div><div class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style=""><br></font></div><div class="plain"><iframe allow="accelerometer; autoplay; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture" allowfullscreen frameborder="0" height="171" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/-I5XDpuBdoU?wmode=transparent" width="300"></iframe><br></div><div class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style=""><br></font></div><div class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style="">Bicep Curl: In this video, the patient is trying to lift a little more weight than he should be. Because of this, he is using momentum to get the weight up. This increases the amount of compression through his low back as he arches. If you finish a bicep curl feeling it more in your low back than your arms, you are not doing it right.</font></div><div class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style=""><br></font></div><div class="plain"><iframe allow="accelerometer; autoplay; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture" allowfullscreen frameborder="0" height="171" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/hiLReDh6V0w?wmode=transparent" width="300"></iframe><br></div><div class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style=""><br></font></div><div class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style="">The patient maintains a neutral spine throughout the activity. There is no swinging going on. Each rep is slow and controlled, which more effectively targets and isolates his biceps.</font></div><div class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style=""><br></font></div><div class="plain"><iframe allow="accelerometer; autoplay; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture" allowfullscreen frameborder="0" height="171" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/KomvK5IlDwY?wmode=transparent" width="300"></iframe><br></div><div class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style=""><br></font></div><div class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style="">Shoulder Press: In this video, we see the patient arch backwards towards the top of the motion. This is in an attempt to use accessory muscles to complete the motion. Not only are we putting our spine in a hazardous position here, but now we are further compressing it with added weight. Yikes!</font></div><div class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style=""><br></font></div><div class="plain"><iframe allow="accelerometer; autoplay; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture" allowfullscreen frameborder="0" height="171" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/TkcTEu4nO60?wmode=transparent" width="300"></iframe><br></div><div class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style=""><br></font></div><div class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style="">In this video, he does not arch his back at any point in the motion. Not only does he keep a neutral spine (flat back), but also ensures that he is targeting his shoulders with each repetition.</font></div><div class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style=""><br></font></div><div class="plain"><iframe allow="accelerometer; autoplay; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture" allowfullscreen frameborder="0" height="171" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/zkyJciK69so?wmode=transparent" width="300"></iframe><br></div><div class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style=""><br></font></div><div class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style="">Row: In this video, the weight is too heavy, as we can see in this video, the patient attempts to use momentum to lift the weight and arches his back. There is also no control during the motion, decreasing the amount of time under tension of the intended muscle group.</font></div><div class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style=""><br></font></div><div class="plain"><iframe allow="accelerometer; autoplay; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture" allowfullscreen frameborder="0" height="171" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/uwMYfflgiZU?wmode=transparent" width="300"></iframe><br></div><div class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style=""><br></font></div><div class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style="">In this video, the patient maintains a neutral spine throughout the activity. He also demonstrates slow controlled repetitions, which increases proper muscle activation throughout his back.</font></div><div class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style=""><br></font></div><div class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style="">Did anyone else notice a pattern here? Not bracing our core or using too much weight can put our backs in harm’s way, but also results in decreased isolated muscle activation. If we aren’t using the right muscles, why are we even doing the exercise? While it may not feel as glorious to curl 20’s instead of 40’s, finding the correct weight that allows for proper form will result in more effective long term strength gains and decrease stress through unnecessary areas.</font></div><div class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style=""><br></font></div><div class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style="">Disclaimer: there are other ways to compensate with these exercises (focus on extension in low back in this blog) but the concepts remain the same: lift inside your capacity,&nbsp; ensure proper spinal position and isolate muscles when you are trying to isolate.</font></div><div class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style=""><br></font></div><div class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style="">By Sam Frommelt, <a class="plainsmall" href="mailto:sam@soulpt.com" link="" rel="" target="_blank">sam@soulpt.com</a> and Nolan Rothwell, SPT</font></div><div class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style=""><br></font></div><div class="plain"><p class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style="">Soul Physical Therapy is a patient centered outpatient orthopedic physical therapy practice located in Beverly, MA. Our evidence-informed philosophy drives our physical therapists to improve the lives of patients through education, manual therapy and exercise. </font></p><p class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style=""><br></font></p><p class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style="">Soul Physical Therapy was the #1 Choice for Physical Therapy in the 2018 Wicked Local Readers Choice Awards for Beverly and was named the 2018 Small Business of the Year by the Greater Beverly Chamber of Commerce. To set up a complimentary screening email <a class="plainsmall" href="mailto:getwell@soulpt.com" link="" target="_blank">getwell@soulpt.com</a>&nbsp;or call (978) 524-0333.</font></p></div>

Rowing - Erg Basics

Dec 4, 2018

<p class="plain"></p><div class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style="">Rowing is a fun and effective way to train your aerobic system. Rowing is a natural motion and can be used indoors with a rowing machine.</font></div><div class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style=""><br></font></div><div class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style="">Below are two videos focusing on the set up position and a drill to hone in your rowing technique.</font></div><div class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style=""><br></font></div><div class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style="">Set up is crucial when beginning to use the Concept 2 Rower as it sets the foundation for your pulling motion. A simple checklist to think of when setting up are:</font></div><div class="plain"><ul><li class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style="">Feet placement: Make sure your feet are at the correct level of foot placement and the strap is tight across your foot.</font></li><li class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style="">Damper Setting: The damper is the lever on the side of the flywheel housing, or fan cage, that controls how much air flows into the cage. A higher damper settings allow more air into the flywheel housing creating more work it takes to spin the flywheel against the air. A lower damper settings allow less air into the flywheel housing, making it easier to spin the flywheel. Think of a gear setting on a bicycle. It is recommended to train at a lower damper setting until you master your technique.</font></li><li class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style="">Posture: Upright posture with shoulder and back musculature engaged</font></li></ul></div><div class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style=""><br></font></div><div align="left" class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style=""><iframe allow="accelerometer; autoplay; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture" allowfullscreen frameborder="0" height="171" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/w2mFbbpxcvk?wmode=transparent" width="300"></iframe><br></font></div><div class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style=""><br></font></div><div class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style="">Legs, Hips and Arms Drill</font></div><div class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style=""><br></font></div><div class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style="">Common mistakes in the rower include rowing with just your arms, rounding your back, setting the damper too high and having a poor sequence of body movements when rowing. The following drill is used to improve the sequence of your rowing. </font></div><div class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style=""><br></font></div><div align="left" class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style=""><iframe allow="accelerometer; autoplay; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture" allowfullscreen frameborder="0" height="171" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/9lVkEGB0_Vk?wmode=transparent" width="300"></iframe><br></font></div><div class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style=""><br></font></div><div class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style="">Dan Griffin SPT, CSCS, CFL2 is currently a clinical student at Soul Physical Therapy. He is a strength coach and CrossFit Level 2 instructor. He will be opening up his own physical therapy practice called Resilience PT and Wellness in Agawam.&nbsp; </font></div><div class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style=""> </font><p class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style=""><br></font></p><p class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style="">Soul Physical Therapy is a patient centered outpatient orthopedic physical therapy practice located in Beverly, MA. Our evidence-informed philosophy drives our physical therapists to improve the lives of patients through education, manual therapy and exercise. </font></p><font class="plainsmall" style=""> </font><p class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style=""><br></font></p> <p class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style="">Soul Physical Therapy was the #1 Choice for Physical Therapy in the 2018 Wicked Local Readers Choice Awards for Beverly and was named the 2018 Small Business of the Year by the Greater Beverly Chamber of Commerce. To set up a complimentary screening email <a class="plainsmall" href="mailto:getwell@soulpt.com" link="" target="_blank">getwell@soulpt.com</a>&nbsp;or call (978) 524-0333.</font></p></div><div class="plain"></div><p class="plain"></p>

Back to Basics: Decreasing Low Back Stress

Oct 23, 2018

<p class="plain"></p><div class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style="">A big problem that we see in our patient populations and in the community are </font></div><div class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style="">misconceptions about proper rib, pelvic, and back positioning during functional </font></div><div class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style="">movements and prolonged postures. A common complaint we often get from </font></div><div class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style="">patients at Soul Physical Therapy is pain localized to the center of their low back or on the sides. Often but not always, the culprit is over arching in our low back (lumbar extension) without proper rib and pelvic position. Correct rib and pelvic position is achieved with activation of the transverse abdominus, a muscle that lies beneath our “6 pack abs”. If unable to activate this muscle appropriately, we can get too much compression in our spine, which can result in muscle tightness and pain. </font></div><div class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style=""><br></font></div><div class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style="">These extension or “arching” positions do not need to be avoided or feared, but we do need to be mindful of what positions we are in for too long. These more extreme positions into extension (arching) put more compressive forces through our spine compared to a neutral or “straighter” spine and are more likely to lead to pain over time if they are sustained or if they are loaded with strength training/lifting. Cortisone shots, heat, electric stimulation, etc. can make this pain feel better temporarily, but in order to rid this pain long term we must clean up our movement patterns to clear up the source of the problem. </font></div><div class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style=""><br></font></div><div class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style="">In this post, we will focus on how to achieve this position and what the differences in these postures look like.</font></div><div class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style=""><br></font></div><div class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style=""><iframe allow="accelerometer; autoplay; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture" allowfullscreen frameborder="0" height="171" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/mfGQRm0oicI?wmode=transparent" width="300"></iframe><br></font></div><div class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style=""><br></font></div><div class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style="">In this video, the subject shows how to achieve that ribs down, neutral spine/pelvis position. If we look at his ribs, we can see how they are pulled down when he activates his transverse abdominus as opposed to the initial rib flare position where his back is more arched and pelvis is rotated forward. This muscle acts to give stability through the spine to help accept the forces that on our body while we are sitting, standing, and moving. </font></div><div class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style=""><br></font></div><div align="left" class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style=""><img width="150" daid="17920777//0104.nccdn.net/1_5/17f/380/2a9/Sam-ant-pelvic-tilt.png?>' size="150"></font></div><div class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style=""><br></font></div><div class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style="">This picture shows the subject in a position where his ribs are flared out, his pelvis rotated forward, and is putting more compression through his low back.</font></div><div class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style=""><br></font></div><div align="left" class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style=""><img width="150" daid="17920778//0104.nccdn.net/1_5/17f/380/2a9/Sam-neutral.png?>' size="150"></font></div><div class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style=""><br></font></div><div class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style="">This picture shows the subject with his ribs down, pelvis in a neutral position with less compression through his lower back.</font></div><div class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style=""><br></font></div><div class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style="">Stay tuned for future blog posts on using these principles in the gym and exercises on how to strengthen these postures!</font></div><div class="plain"> <p class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style=""><br></font></p><p class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style="">Soul Physical Therapy is a patient centered outpatient orthopedic physical therapy practice located in Beverly, MA. Our evidence-informed philosophy drives our physical therapists to improve the lives of patients through education, manual therapy and exercise.&nbsp;</font></p> <p class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style=""><br></font></p> <p class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style="">Soul Physical Therapy was the #1 Choice for Physical Therapy in the 2018 Wicked Local Readers Choice Awards for Beverly and was named the 2018 Small Business of the Year by the Greater Beverly Chamber of Commerce. To set up a complimentary screening email <a class="plainsmall" href="mailto:getwell@soulpt.com" link="" target="_blank">getwell@soulpt.com</a>&nbsp;or call (978) 524-0333.</font></p></div><div class="plain"></div><p class="plain"></p>

Movement Variability at Work

Oct 8, 2018

<p class="plain"></p><div class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style="">Posture vs Sustained posture</font></div><div class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style=""><br></font></div><div class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style="">Perfect posture is really a myth and super hard to maintain.&nbsp; Think of more sustained postures as being problematic at work and in life.</font></div><div class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style=""><br></font></div><div class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style="">When we sustain postures for too long we can put undue strain on certain areas of the body. </font></div><div class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style=""><br></font></div><div class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style="">The best way to combat sustained postures are through movement "resets".&nbsp; The allow one to maintain movement variability and can also decrease pain.</font></div><div class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style=""><br></font></div><div class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style="">Sustained forward head and rounded shoulder posturing is something we consistently see in our corporate wellness work.</font></div><div class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style=""><br></font></div><div class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style="">Balance things out...</font></div><div class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style=""><br></font></div><div class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style="">Three common exercises we program are chin tucks, shoulder blade squeezes and a towel technique to maintain your ability to turn your head.</font></div><div class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style=""><br></font></div><div class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style="">To combat forward head posturing we program in chin tucks:</font></div><div class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style=""><br></font></div><div class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style=""><iframe allow="accelerometer; autoplay; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture" allowfullscreen frameborder="0" height="171" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/zgn86w2hD7U?wmode=transparent" width="300"></iframe><br></font></div><div class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style=""><br></font></div><div class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style="">To combat forward rounded shoulders:</font></div><div class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style=""><br></font></div><div class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style=""><iframe allow="accelerometer; autoplay; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture" allowfullscreen frameborder="0" height="171" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/H47yerbskkQ?wmode=transparent" width="300"></iframe><br></font></div><div class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style=""><br></font></div><div class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style="">To maintain neck turning we use this towel technique:</font></div><div class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style=""><br></font></div><div class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style=""><iframe allow="accelerometer; autoplay; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture" allowfullscreen frameborder="0" height="171" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/LTlZu1J9f0o?wmode=transparent" width="300"></iframe><br></font></div><div class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style=""><br></font></div><div class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style="">Did you know that Soul PT offers Corporate Wellness Projects that have saved companies hundreds of thousands of dollars? Check out our case study on our website to learn more:</font></div><div class="plain"><a class="plainsmall" href="/soulpt/wellness-program.html" link="" rel="" target="_self"><font class="plainsmall" style="">Corporate Wellness Case Study</font></a></div><div class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style=""><br></font></div><div class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style=""> </font><p class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style="">Soul Physical Therapy is a patient centered outpatient orthopedic physical therapy practice located in Beverly, MA. Our evidence-informed philosophy drives our physical therapists to improve the lives of patients through education, manual therapy and exercise.&nbsp;</font></p> <p class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style=""><br></font></p> <p class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style="">Soul Physical Therapy was the #1 Choice for Physical Therapy in the 2018 Wicked Local Readers Choice Awards for Beverly and was named the 2018 Small Business of the Year by the Greater Beverly Chamber of Commerce. To set up a complimentary screening email <a class="plainsmall" href="mailto:getwell@soulpt.com" link="" target="_blank">getwell@soulpt.com</a>&nbsp;or call (978) 524-0333.</font></p></div><p class="plain"></p>

Single Leg Deadlift Variations

Aug 8, 2018

<div class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style="">All promote weight acceptance and stability in the stance leg or forward leg.</font></div><p class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style=""><br></font></p><div class="plain"><p class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style="">No weight</font></p></div><ul><li class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style="">Greater focus on balance because there’s no weight to counterbalance the movement.</font></li><li class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style="">If unsteady - foam roller or resistance band in the opposite hand is helpful or&nbsp; lateralizing the movement to a kickstand RDL.</font></li></ul><span class="plain" style=""><font class="plainsmall" style=""><br><iframe allow="accelerometer; autoplay; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture" allowfullscreen frameborder="0" height="171" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/w3zMQXxOcNs?wmode=transparent" width="300"></iframe></font></span><div class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style=""><br></font></div><div class="plain"><p class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style="">Weighted split stance</font></p></div><ul><li class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style="">Helpful if balance is unstable, still able to effectively strengthen the posterior chain of the front leg.</font></li><li class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style="">Still can target one leg greater than the other which oftentimes is a target of rehab.</font></li></ul><span class="plain" style=""><font class="plainsmall" style=""><br></font></span><p class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style=""><iframe allow="accelerometer; autoplay; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture" allowfullscreen frameborder="0" height="171" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/xqTs4R9Q59U?wmode=transparent" width="300"></iframe><br></font></p><div class="plain"><p class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style=""><br></font></p><p class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style="">Weighted &amp; resistance band; resistance band - no weight; foam roller</font></p></div><ul><li class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style="">Resistance band or foam roller increase tension in your anterior core and lat.</font></li><li class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style="">The resistance band also encourages keeping the weight close to the body that translates to traditional RDLs and improves overall lifting mechanics.</font></li></ul><div class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style=""><br></font></div><div class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style=""><iframe allow="accelerometer; autoplay; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture" allowfullscreen frameborder="0" height="171" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/12tF8SFfSxc?wmode=transparent" width="300"></iframe><br></font></div><div class="plain"><p class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style=""><br></font></p><p class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style="">Weight</font></p></div><ul><li class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style="">Useful if PT is able to maintain proper upper body posture during the movement.</font></li></ul><ul><li class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style="">Can increase load to continually achieve strength gains.</font></li></ul><ul><li class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style="">May actually decrease the balance challenge due to counter balance effect.</font></li></ul><ul></ul><div class="plain"><p class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style=""><br></font></p><p class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style=""><iframe allow="accelerometer; autoplay; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture" allowfullscreen frameborder="0" height="171" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/JVZpi5OpQ44?wmode=transparent" width="300"></iframe><br></font></p></div><div class="plain"><p class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style=""><br></font></p><p class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style="">Soul Physical Therapy is a patient centered outpatient orthopedic physical therapy practice located in Beverly, MA. Our evidence-informed philosophy drives our physical therapists to improve the lives of patients through education, manual therapy and exercise.&nbsp;</font></p><p class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style=""><br></font></p><p class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style=""> </font></p><p class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style="">Soul Physical Therapy was the #1 Choice for Physical Therapy in the 2018 Wicked Local Readers Choice Awards for Beverly and was named the 2018 Small Business of the Year by the Greater Beverly Chamber of Commerce. To set up a complimentary screening email <a class="plainsmall" href="mailto:getwell@soulpt.com" link="" target="_blank">getwell@soulpt.com</a>&nbsp;or call (978) 524-0333.</font></p><p class="plain"></p></div>

How to Manage "Mom Posture"

Jul 15, 2018

<div class="plain"><p class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style="">Being a mom is tough work. Feeding, holding, carrying and cleaning your new little one is the hardest, best job you will ever have. Once you get a minute to catch your breath you may begin noticing new aches and pains. “Mom Posture” is a term used to describe the cause of some of these pains- rounded shoulders, forward head posture and an anterior pelvic tilt are some of them. Here are a few tips and stretches to aid in reducing those symptoms and to help improve your posture.</font></p></div><div class="plain"><p class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style=""><br></font></p><p class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style="">Tip 1:</font></p></div><div class="plain"><p class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style="">Switch sides when holding your baby. We become accustomed to holding our kids on one side causing unilateral back, hip, neck, and shoulder pain. By alternating sides, we can help equal that repetitive weight shift.</font></p><p class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style=""><br></font></p><p align="left" class="plain"><a class="plainsmall" href="https://3.bp.blogspot.com/-QmATpZFP7KI/W0zFGxN6INI/AAAAAAAAAd4/0hR5wijE4KsLtyAXjHvJQ92TgASc13GdQCLcBGAs/s1600/IMG_0469.jpeg" link="" target="_blank"><font class="plainsmall" style=""><img width="150" daid="17915130//0104.nccdn.net/1_5/159/376/2be/IMG_0469.jpeg?>' border="0" size="150"></font></a></p></div><div class="plain"><p class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style=""><br></font></p></div><div class="plain"><p class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style="">Tip 2:</font></p></div><div class="plain"><p class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style="">Use pillows to help support you and baby when nursing or bottle feeding. This can help to decrease the amount you will round your shoulders and neck, and let you relax!</font></p></div><div class="plain"><p class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style=""><br></font></p></div><div class="plain"><p class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style="">Tip 3:</font></p></div><div class="plain"><p class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style="">Utilize a small seat or stool when bathing your baby in the bathtub. It is easy to just kneel down and lean over the tub, however, a simple step or stool can allow you to maintain a straight back during bath time.</font></p></div><div class="plain"><p class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style=""><br></font></p></div><div class="plain"><p class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style="">Tip 4:</font></p></div><div class="plain"><p class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style="">Try this alternative position for carrying a car seat. This position can help keep you upright while carrying your little one around. (picture)</font></p></div><div class="plain"><p class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style=""><br></font></p></div><div class="plain"><p class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style="">Stretches:</font></p></div><div class="plain"><p class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style=""><br></font></p></div><div class="plain"><p class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style="">1.&nbsp; &nbsp;&nbsp; Doorway Pec Stretch </font></p></div><p align="left" class="plain"><a class="plainsmall" href="https://2.bp.blogspot.com/-GZwAlh1Rbko/W0x99GfLzkI/AAAAAAAAAdE/7zdrWvazDS0EQ7NlFFIo_NijA69r3HJmACLcBGAs/s1600/IMG_0470.jpeg" link="" target="_blank"><font class="plainsmall" style=""><img width="150" daid="17915131//0104.nccdn.net/1_5/159/376/2be/IMG_0470.jpeg?>' border="0" size="150"></font></a></p><p class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style=""><br></font></p><div class="plain"><p class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style="">2.&nbsp; &nbsp;&nbsp; Chin Tuck </font></p></div><p align="left" class="plain"><a class="plainsmall" href="https://3.bp.blogspot.com/-V4837-tDEoI/W0x-HH3V1FI/AAAAAAAAAdI/ggGYobsibbwyJP14RKDG1YUQ6IQWsBmewCLcBGAs/s1600/IMG_0475.jpeg" link="" target="_blank"><font class="plainsmall" style=""><img width="150" daid="17915132//0104.nccdn.net/1_5/3b8/138/318/IMG_0475.jpeg?>' border="0" size="150"></font></a></p><div class="plain"><p class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style=""><br></font></p></div><div class="plain"><p class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style="">3.&nbsp; &nbsp;&nbsp; Side Lying Rotations </font></p></div><p align="left" class="plain"><a class="plainsmall" href="https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-HIdnlfe5YvY/W0x-RBuulwI/AAAAAAAAAdQ/lpLe6HU044sq_bGk9O5odH2bSFAylDCmQCLcBGAs/s1600/IMG_0477.jpeg" link="" target="_blank"><font class="plainsmall" style=""><img width="150" daid="17915134//0104.nccdn.net/1_5/3b8/138/318/IMG_0477.jpeg?>' border="0" size="150"></font></a></p><div class="plain"><p class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style=""><br></font></p></div><div class="plain"><p class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style="">4.&nbsp; &nbsp;&nbsp; Scapular Squeezes </font></p></div><p align="left" class="plain"><a class="plainsmall" href="https://2.bp.blogspot.com/-qp7b8Pr_yBg/W0x-dMdmJ3I/AAAAAAAAAdY/rrd7_fv4cO03ZzClpoLHr4DJLqmpEp_OwCLcBGAs/s1600/IMG_0476.jpeg" link="" target="_blank"><font class="plainsmall" style=""><img width="150" daid="17915135//0104.nccdn.net/1_5/159/376/2be/IMG_0476.jpeg?>' border="0" size="150"></font></a></p><div class="plain"><p class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style=""><br></font></p></div><div class="plain"><p class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style="">If you have questions or want to set up a free screening with our resident mom Kara Jesi DPT, call Soul PT (978) 524-0333 or <a class="plainsmall" href="mailto:Kara@SoulPT.com" link="" rel="" target="_blank">Kara@SoulPT.com</a>.</font></p><p class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style=""><br></font></p><p class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style=""> </font></p><p class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style="">Soul Physical Therapy is a patient centered outpatient orthopedic physical therapy practice located in Beverly, MA. Our evidence-informed philosophy drives our physical therapists to improve the lives of patients through education, manual therapy and exercise.&nbsp;</font></p> <p class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style=""><br></font></p> <p class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style="">Soul Physical Therapy was the #1 Choice for Physical Therapy in the 2018 Wicked Local Readers Choice Awards for Beverly and was named the 2018 Small Business of the Year by the Greater Beverly Chamber of Commerce. To set up a complimentary screening email <a class="plainsmall" href="mailto:getwell@soulpt.com" link="" target="_blank">getwell@soulpt.com</a>&nbsp;or call (978) 524-0333.</font></p><br><p class="plain"></p></div>

Bridge Progression

Mar 15, 2018

<p class="plain"></p><div class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style="">The bridge is my go-to exercise for developing baseline anterior core stiffness, glute activation, and terminal hip extension.&nbsp; If you can't bridge correctly is unlikely that you can execute a proper squat, deadlift or many other lower body and core exercises effectively.&nbsp; You will need to master the rib position and core stabilization foundation in the first video prior to advancing to the next progressions.</font></div><div class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style=""><br></font></div><div class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style="">1. Diaphragm breathing / rib depression with body weight bridge</font></div><div class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style="">Breathe in through your nose while allowing your belly to fill with air. Use purse lips and forcefully, but slowly exhale allowing your rib cage to drop down and abdominals to tighten.&nbsp; This creates helpful stiffness stabilizing your lower back. Tighten your glutes and bridge up without losing core stiffness - your body should be in a straight line, without an arch or pressure in your low back</font></div><div class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style=""><br></font></div><div class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style=""><iframe allow="accelerometer; autoplay; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture" allowfullscreen frameborder="0" height="171" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/Ned6RsPyFWw?wmode=transparent" width="300"></iframe><br></font></div><div class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style=""><br></font></div><div class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style="">2. Single leg glute bridge (floor and elevated)</font></div><div class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style="">Bend one leg up to maximize glute contraction on the opposite side. Keep pelvis level (not allowing it to drop on one side) as you bridge up. Elevating the working leg will increase range of motion and difficulty</font></div><div class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style=""><br></font></div><div class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style=""><iframe allow="accelerometer; autoplay; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture" allowfullscreen frameborder="0" height="171" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/puTrZF-lHG4?wmode=transparent" width="300"></iframe><br></font></div><div class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style=""><br></font></div><div class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style="">3. Band resisted bridges</font></div><div class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style="">Working against the resistance of the band requires you to create more tension and help build more adaptation. Stay tight in your abs with your ribs down to prevent arching in your lower back.</font></div><div class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style=""><br></font></div><div class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style=""><iframe allow="accelerometer; autoplay; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture" allowfullscreen frameborder="0" height="171" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/-k_fVob7dgs?wmode=transparent" width="300"></iframe><br></font></div><div class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style=""><br></font></div><div class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style="">Stay tuned as we load the bridge up with 135 lb.</font></div><div class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style=""><br></font></div><div class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style="">If you have any questions about the exercises or want to learn how to apply them into your training. Schedule a complimentary screening with Jenna Mattera DPT, CSCS.</font></div><div class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style=""><br></font></div><div class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style=""> </font><p class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style="">Soul Physical Therapy is a patient centered outpatient orthopedic physical therapy practice located in Beverly, MA. Our evidence-informed philosophy drives our physical therapists to improve the lives of patients through education, manual therapy and exercise.&nbsp;</font></p> <p class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style=""><br></font></p> <p class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style="">Soul Physical Therapy was the #1 Choice for Physical Therapy in the 2018 Wicked Local Readers Choice Awards for Beverly and was named the 2018 Small Business of the Year by the Greater Beverly Chamber of Commerce. To set up a complimentary screening email <a class="plainsmall" href="mailto:getwell@soulpt.com" link="" target="_blank">getwell@soulpt.com</a>&nbsp;or call (978) 524-0333.</font></p></div><p class="plain"></p>

Mindset and the Healing Process — Do you Know your Why?

Jan 22, 2018

<p class="plain"></p><div class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style="">The healing process can feel like a roller coaster ride — one day we’re feeling pretty good, the next we’re in pain and unable to do what we did the day before. You might feel limited by pain, or are going through a rehab process and focusing on not only decreasing pain, but also restoring mobility, strength, and function so that you can get back into doing what you love to do.</font></div><div class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style=""><br></font></div><div class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style="">Our ability to ride these roller coaster waves with some modicum of grace greatly influences the healing process. Healing is not linear and looks a bit like this:</font></div><div class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style=""><br></font></div><div class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style=""><img width="150" daid="17923045//0104.nccdn.net/1_5/128/266/19a/Xn-BXybOGeEwcdyuDy3tmjO6VWj4E7zABOh-TIsp71CzGEHd-1QTsJr1gV3fMe_fLNxSpZe6IS_XKgfV?>' height="112" size="150"></font></div><div class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style=""><br></font></div><div class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style="">Goiun and Kiecolt-Glaser state “psychological stress and other behavioral factors can affect wound healing. The relationship between stress and wound repair is not only statistically significant, but also clinically relevant.”¹</font></div><div class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style=""><br></font></div><div class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style="">What type of psychological stresses slow the healing process?</font></div><div class="plain"><ul><li class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style="">Fear pre and post-op, as well as fear avoidance</font></li><li class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style="">Optimism, or lack thereof</font></li><li class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style="">Depression</font></li><li class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style="">Anxiety</font></li><li class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style="">Pain</font></li><li class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style="">Interpersonal conflicts/disagreements</font></li><li class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style="">Anger</font></li><li class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style="">Apathy</font></li></ul><font class="plainsmall" style=""><br></font></div><div class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style="">Over the next few blog posts, I will be sharing with you some of the key factors towards managing and reducing stress, that you can immediately implement, in order to optimize your healing process and help you to get back into doing what you do.</font></div><div class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style=""><br></font></div><div class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style="">In today’s blog, we’ll dive into discovering what I like to call “your why.”</font></div><div class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style=""><br></font></div><div class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style="">Why is it important to discover your why? </font></div><div class="plain"><b><font class="plainsmall" style="">Your why will be one of the key motivators that keeps you going when you experience challenging days.</font></b></div><div class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style=""><br></font></div><div class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style="">Grab a piece of paper and write down these questions. Then, write down your answers to the questions.</font></div><div class="plain"><ul><li class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style="">Why do you want to get better?</font></li><li class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style="">What do you want to be able to do?</font></li><li class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style="">Why do you want to do that?</font></li><li class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style="">How will you feel once you are able to reach your rehabilitative goals?</font></li></ul></div><div class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style=""><br></font></div><div class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style="">There are no right or wrong answers. The answers will be unique to you, your lifestyle, and your process. Perhaps you want to be able to pick up your kids again, be able to walk without fear of falling over, or return to playing sports. Close your eyes and picture yourself doing whatever it is your particular goal is, your why is. Allow yourself to see yourself doing it in action and notice how you feel. </font></div><div class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style=""><br></font></div><div class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style="">This is the place where visualization meets manifestation, meets action, and in this case, meets healing. It’s a technique used by actors, sports players, millionaires, etc to bring what they want into the NOW. </font></div><div class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style=""><br></font></div><div class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style="">Before doing your home exercise program, envision yourself where you want to be, feel yourself there, then take action and do your program.</font></div><div class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style=""><br></font></div><div class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style="">Anytime you start to feel stress-inducing emotions, or reactions, breathe and revisit your why. </font></div><div class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style=""><br></font></div><div class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style="">About Amanda Leigh Patti:</font></div><div class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style="">Amanda is a High Performance Mentor and Mindset Coach. As a single mother of two amazing young men and an entrepreneur, she understands the unique demands and stressors that balancing business and personal life entails. She has used a variety of holistic modalities to move through pain, stress, and fear after leaving an emotionally abusive marriage, recover from physical injury after a car accident and debilitating yoga injury, and become a powerful advocate for her children. She excels at helping high performers reduce stress and overwhelm, increase their intrinsic happiness, and develop more intimate relationships.</font></div><div class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style=""><br></font></div><div class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style="">Amanda has been studying and practicing the art of personal growth, movement, and relationships for the past 23 years. In 2014, she became a Certified Holistic Lifestyle Coach with the CHEK Institute. She is also a Certified Yoga Teacher, movement teacher, and humanitarian. At the heart of her work, Amanda has a desire to connect people to the core of who they are through a multi-dimensional approach to healing, rooted in traditional wisdom and modern arts. Find out more about Amanda here: <a class="plainsmall" href="http://amandaleighpatti.com/" link="" rel="" target="_blank">http://amandaleighpatti.com</a>&nbsp;</font></div><div class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style=""><br></font></div><div class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style=""><img width="150" daid="17923047//0104.nccdn.net/1_5/128/266/19a/Amanda-Leigh-Patti.jpg?>' height="225" border="0" size="150"><br></font></div><div class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style=""><br></font></div><div class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style="">References:</font></div><div class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style="">¹Goiun, Jean-Phillipe and Janice K. Kiecolt-Glaser. </font></div><div class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style="">The Impact of Psychological Stress on Wound Healing: Methods and Mechanisms. </font></div><div class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style="">Immunol Allergy Clin North Am 2011 Feb: 31(1): 81-93.</font></div><div class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style="">Image: allennance.com</font></div><p class="plain"></p>

Three Reasons to do Single Leg Work

Apr 5, 2017

<p class="plain"></p><div class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style="">Picture this, you are standing in line at the bank, it's a busy day so you are there for a while. Initially, you have relatively good posture. After some time you take out your phone start playing with it and before you know it you find yourself shifting all of your weight onto one leg, the back is rounded down looking at your phone and that nagging ache in your lower back starts saying "Hi! remember me?".</font></div><div class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style=""><br></font></div><div class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style="">Chances are you favor that same leg most of the time.&nbsp; This is natural, we tend to have one limb stronger than the other, after all we are asymmetrical beings.</font></div><div class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style=""><br></font></div><div class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style="">The issue is not of one leg being stronger than the other as much as it is an issue of loading avoidance of the weaker limb. </font></div><div class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style=""><br></font></div><div class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style="">When this is the case there should be a graded exposure approach to regaining stability, strength, functionality and more importantly confidence in a single limb stance position.</font></div><div class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style=""><br></font></div><div class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style="">Which takes us into the 1st reason:</font></div><div class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style=""><br></font></div><div class="plain"><b><font class="plainsmall" style="">Movement Variability</font></b></div><div class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style=""><br></font></div><div class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style="">Exploring movement breeds confidence!</font></div><div class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style=""><br></font></div><div class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style="">Many times the reason why we feel a sense of doubt before setting out on a new adventure is due to the element of the unknown. We have not experienced it before, hence we are uncertain of the outcome. The same concept applies to the body. If we don't put ourselves in these positions our body does not recognize them and consequently we lack control. </font></div><div class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style=""><br></font></div><div class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style="">Exploring movement in a graded manner sets up a platform where you progress through variations of a movement with each variation setting the foundation for the next one.</font></div><div class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style=""><br></font></div><div class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style="">This is crucial when our perception of a specific movement is "threatening".&nbsp; By regressing it to a less threatening movement we increase our time in that position boosting our confidence and setting a solid foundation from where to build upon. </font></div><div class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style=""><br></font></div><div class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style="">Example: If Single Leg Deadlifts (SLDL) are iffy try single leg weight passes become comfortable on one leg and then progress to the SLDL.</font></div><div class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style=""><br></font></div><div class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style=""><iframe allow="accelerometer; autoplay; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture" allowfullscreen frameborder="0" height="171" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/3ZLpFhkP0u8?wmode=transparent" width="300"></iframe><br></font></div><div class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style=""><br></font></div><div class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style=""><iframe allow="accelerometer; autoplay; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture" allowfullscreen frameborder="0" height="171" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/XJ9h0xVMXBw?wmode=transparent" width="300"></iframe><br></font></div><div class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style=""><br></font></div><div class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style="">When becoming familiar with a new movement initial focus should be on control. </font></div><div class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style=""><br></font></div><div class="plain"><b><font class="plainsmall" style="">It's a core workout! Control vs. Load </font></b></div><div class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style=""><br></font></div><div class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style="">While you stand on one leg your body is fighting the urge to side bend and collapse. </font></div><div class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style=""><br></font></div><div class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style="">How does it do this? Core engagement!</font></div><div class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style=""><br></font></div><div class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style="">Yes, step ups are a core exercise...when performed properly.&nbsp; Focus should be on an upright posture resisting the pull towards the unstable side. This added core engagement promotes proper posture and grooves a more efficient action.</font></div><div class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style=""><br></font></div><div class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style="">The body should feel comfortable in these single leg positions. This way, if it ever finds itself in an unstable situation it is more likely to recognize and react accordingly.</font></div><div class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style=""><br></font></div><div class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style="">Even for advanced lifters becoming efficient at controlling a movement should come before implementing load.&nbsp; This emphasis on proper form enhances the efficiency of movements, which takes us into the next benefit.</font></div><div class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style=""><br></font></div><div class="plain"><b><font class="plainsmall" style="">Avoiding Energy Leaks</font></b></div><div class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style=""><br></font></div><div class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style="">This added focus on core engagement might demand more energy in the initial stages of training but, by developing sound movement energy leaks are avoided when they really count. </font></div><div class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style=""><br></font></div><div class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style="">Owning a single leg stance wether it be through a weight pass or marching drills translates well into sport performance. The key here is to load properly without compromising structural integrity of the movement.</font></div><div class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style=""><br></font></div><div class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style="">Think about it...</font></div><div class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style=""><br></font></div><div class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style="">Running is a continuous controlled fall where you are always on one leg. For this reason by increasing the time spent on each leg individually will be beneficial towards performance.</font></div><div class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style=""><br></font></div><div class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style="">By Angel Lopez CSCS</font></div><div class="plain"> <p class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style=""><br></font></p><p class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style="">Soul Physical Therapy is a patient centered outpatient orthopedic physical therapy practice located in Beverly, MA. Our evidence-informed philosophy drives our physical therapists to improve the lives of patients through education, manual therapy and exercise.&nbsp;</font></p> <p class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style=""><br></font></p> <p class="plain"><font class="plainsmall" style="">Soul Physical Therapy was the #1 Choice for Physical Therapy in the 2018 Wicked Local Readers Choice Awards for Beverly and was named the 2018 Small Business of the Year by the Greater Beverly Chamber of Commerce. To set up a complimentary screening email <a class="plainsmall" href="mailto:getwell@soulpt.com" link="" target="_blank">getwell@soulpt.com</a>&nbsp;or call (978) 524-0333.</font></p></div><div class="plain"></div><p class="plain"></p>